Tag Archives: Aviation

Asiana Flight 214 followup

The following excerpts are from Wikipedia regarding Flight 214. What they do is reinforce the paradigm that the Aviation industry is a complex adaptive system (CAS) with many agents like the NTSB and ALPA who interact with each other. The imposed fine of $500K reconfirms the need to Act when in the Chaotic domain but more importantly, Sense and Respond to the needs of all people impacted by communicating your actions clearly and quickly.

“Shortly after the accident, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) used Twitter and YouTube to inform the public about the investigation and quickly publish quotes from press conferences. NTSB first tweeted about Asiana 214 less than one hour after the crash. One hour after that, the NTSB announced via Twitter that officials would hold a press conference at Reagan Airport Hangar 6 before departing for San Francisco. Less than 12 hours after the crash, the NTSB released a photo showing investigators conducting their first site assessment.

Air Line Pilots Association

On July 9, 2013, the Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA) criticized the NTSB for releasing “incomplete, out-of-context information” that gave the impression that pilot error was entirely to blame.

NTSB Chairman Hersman responded: “The information we’re providing is consistent with our procedures and processes … One of the hallmarks of the NTSB is our transparency.  We work for the traveling public. There are a lot of organizations and groups that have advocates. We are the advocate for the traveling public. We believe it’s important to show our work and tell people what we are doing.”  Answering ALPA’s criticism, NTSB spokeswoman Kelly Nantel also said the agency routinely provided factual updates during investigations. “For the public to have confidence in the investigative process, transparency and accuracy are critical,” Nantel said.

On July 11, 2013, in a follow-up press release without criticizing the NTSB, ALPA gave a general warning against speculation.

Fines

On February 25, 2014 the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) fined Asiana Airlines US$500,000 for failing to keep victims and family of victims updated on the crash.”

 

When a disaster happens, how fast do you act?

In the Cynefin framework, we place unexpected negative events into the Chaotic domain. The solution methodology is to Act-Sense-Respond. When a disaster produces personal injuries and fatalities, Act is about initially rendering the situation as safe as possible and stabilizing conditions to prevent additional life-threatening events from occurring.

Whenever a disaster happens, we go into “damage control” mode. We think were in control because we determine what information will be released, when and by whom. Distributing information to the right channels is a key action under Act. We try our best to limit the damage not only to our people and equipment but to our brand, reputation, and credibility. In other terms, we attempt to protect our level of trust with customers/clients, media, general public.

In the latter stages of the 20th century, breakthroughs in information technology meant we had to learn how to quickly communicate because news traveled really fast. In today’s 21st century, news can spread even faster, wider, and cheaper by anyone who can tweet, upload a Facebook or Google+ photo, blog, etc. The damage control window has literally shrunk from hours to minutes to seconds.

This month we sadly experienced a tragedy at SFO when Asian Airlines flight 214 crashed. I recently reviewed slides produced by SimpliFlying, an aviation consultancy focused on crisis management. Their 2013 July 06 timeline of events is mind boggling:

11:27am: Plane makes impact at SFO
11.28am: First photo from a Google employee boarding another flight hits Twitter (within 30 secs!)
11.30am: Emergency slides deployed
11.45am: First photo from a passenger posted on Path, Facebook and Twitter
11.56am: Norwegian journalists asks for permission to use photo from first posters. Tons of other requests follow
1.20pm: Boeing issues statement via Twitter
2.04pm: SFO Fire Department speaks to the press
3.00pm: NTSB holds press conference, and keeps updating Twitter with photos
3.39pm: Asiana Airlines statement released
3.40pm: White House releases statement
8.43pm: First Asiana Press release (6.43am Korea time)

Although Asiana Airlines first Facebook update was welcomed, they did not provide regular updates and didn’t bother replying to tweets. Bottom line was their stock price and brand took huge hits. Essentially they were ill prepared to Act properly.

“In the age of the connected traveller, airlines do not have 20 minutes, but rather 20 seconds to respond to a crisis situation. Asiana Airlines clearly was not ready for this situation that ensued online. But each airline and airport needs to build social media into its standard operating procedures for crises management.”

If you encounter a disaster, how fast are you able to act? Does your emergency restoration plan include social media channels? Do you need to rewrite your Business Disaster Recovery SOPs?

If you choose to revisit or rewrite, what paradigm will you be in? If it’s Systems Thinking, your view is to control information. Have little regard for what others say and only release information when you are ready. Like Asiana Airlines.  If you’re in the Complexity & Sense-Making paradigm, you realize you cannot control but only can influence. You join and participate in the connected network that’s already fast at work commenting on your disaster.

That’s Act. How you decide to Sense and Respond will be subsequently covered.